Albert Okura's wardrobe seems to consist exclusively of polo shirts with the name of his fast food chain, Juan Pollo, embroidered over his heart. The shirt and a pair of sunglasses are his uniform. Okura, 65, wears a black version of the polo in photos posted to the Juan Pollo website; he sports a striped one for a photo in The San Bernardino Sun while holding a rotisserie spit stacked tight with whole chickens; another while standing in front of the dusty McDonald's museum he opened in downtown San Bernardino, California.

Less than three miles from the museum, one of Okura's Juan Pollo chicken restaurants is set on a dusty four-lane road with few trees, kitty-corner from one of San Bernardino's many pawn shops. Though West Fifth Street was once part of historic Route 66, not much about it looks pull-off-the-road-and-read-a-plaque-worthy today. In July, the 100+ degree days let off so much heat here that it looks like you're driving into a mirage. Yet Okura has tried to turn this restaurant, the second location in a chain of more than two dozen, into a tourist destination of sorts. If Okura gets his way, someday people might visit the McDonald's museum, then pop over to see the place where the grand chicken empire of Juan Pollo began.

Juan Pollo has all the hallmarks of a kitschy local chain. There are framed newspaper cutouts from the three decades Okura's been in business, photos of Okura smiling with generations of Miss Juan Pollos in bikinis, heels, and tight dresses, and Polaroids of guests with their testimonials written in Sharpie. ("I eat here all the time. I should be ½ owner," reads one.) The tables are brightly painted with murals of a pastoral countryside. It's the kind of roadside spot that travelers are tempted to stop at simply to see how a place so thoroughly un-Instagramable could have stayed in business for so long.

The secret is all in the chicken.

Inside the Juan Pollo restaurant in San Bernardino. | (Sarah Swaty/Courtesy Narratively)

These birds aren't fried or covered in batter. Each one is mopped with marinade then slow-cooked in a rotisserie for three hours. It was a process of trial and error to get the Juan Pollo recipe just right, after Okura's brother-in-law Armando Parra took him to Mexico to taste chicken the way it is done south of the border.

Okura wasn't a chef or a businessman before opening the first restaurant in 1984. He admits that he didn't even like chicken growing up. But he has always loved fast food.

In 1961, 10-year-old Okura, who grew up in Wilmington, California, delivered the San Pedro News Pilot from his bicycle for a dollar a day and then rode to the best fast food restaurants, sometimes two or three miles away, where hamburgers were 29 cents each. Soon a McDonald's opened up nearby. Their burgers were an unheard-of 15 cents, and their marvelous golden fries cost only a dime. It was a pivotal point for young Okura. He says that he "ate every hamburger that ever was." The fast food industry was exploding in Southern California and he was on the frontline. He drank it all in like a milkshake.

During college, he went to work for Burger King and stayed for eight years. Then he switched to Del Taco where he was a manager and training supervisor for three years.

It's difficult to look at San Bernardino today and imagine it as a thriving city, much less the birthplace of modern, assembly-line style, fast-food franchising. In the 2010 census, it ranked as the second poorest large city in the nation — coming in behind only Detroit. Roughly 35 percent of residents live below the poverty line and crime rates are high.

But Okura has tied his destiny — and, in many ways, Juan Pollo's — to the city that birthed the most famous fast food chain in history.

Read the rest of this story at Narratively.

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