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November 14, 2017
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Hours after witnesses first described hearing explosions and gunfire in Zimbabwe's capital, Harare, early Wednesday morning, Zimbabwe's army said in a televised statement that what is taking place is not "a military takeover of government" and that President Robert Mugabe is safe and under protection.

The army is targeting people who "were committing crimes that are causing social and economic suffering in the country," the statement said. "As soon as we have accomplished our mission, we expect that the situation will return to normalcy." Armed vehicles were seen lining the streets outside of Harare, the BBC reports, and witnesses told Reuters that soldiers took control of the state-run broadcaster ZBC and manhandled some staffers.

Earlier this month, Mugabe, 93, ousted Vice President Emmerson Mnangagwa, who had been viewed as Mugabe's likely successor; the new frontrunner is Mugabe's wife, Grace. On Monday, Gen. Constantine Chiwenga said if there are any more purges in the ruling Zanu-PF party, the army "will not hesitate to step in," and the government responded Tuesday by accusing him of "treasonable conduct." Catherine Garcia

1:56 p.m. ET

Japanese officials are using emergency loudspeakers normally reserved for earthquake alerts to warn residents of the city of Gamagori not to eat potentially deadly fish sold from a local supermarket, The Japan Times reports. The local store allegedly sold five packages of fugu without removing the fish's liver, which can contain an extremely dangerous neurotoxin. "Eating fugu liver can paralyze motor nerves, and in a serious case cause respiratory arrest leading to death," officials warned.

Fugu is an expensive delicacy, but it is also so dangerous that it must be prepared for consumption by specially licensed professionals. There is not an antidote for its poison, which can be more toxic than cyanide and is also found in its skin, intestines, and ovaries, the BBC reports.

So far, three of the five packages sold by the store have been recovered "but we still don't know where the remaining two are," said local official Koji Takayanagi. Jeva Lange

12:56 p.m. ET
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Swiss food and beverage company Nestlé announced the sale of its American candy businesses, including brands like Crunch, Gobstopper, and Butterfinger, to the Italian confectionary company Ferrero for $2.8 billion, CNBC reports. The sale will evidently make Ferrero, which owns Nutella and Ferrero Rocher pralines, the third-largest chocolate company in the world.

"With Ferrero we have found an exceptional home for our U.S. confectionery business where it will thrive," said Nestlé CEO Mark Schneider. "At the same time, this move allows Nestlé to invest and innovate across a range of categories where we see strong future growth and hold leadership positions, such as pet care, bottled water, coffee, frozen meals, and infant nutrition.”

Nestlé's chocolate brands have reportedly been struggling in the U.S. due to "consumers' preference for healthier snacks like fruit and nut bars and premium brands like Lindt," CNBC writes. The sale will not include Nestlé's Toll House products or candies it produces globally, like KitKat. Jeva Lange

12:33 p.m. ET

Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen appeared before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday and faced some tough questions about President Trump's recent disparaging remarks about Haiti, El Salvador, and African nations, which he reportedly called "shithole countries."

In his round of questioning, Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) asked Nielsen what the president meant when he expressed a desire for the U.S. to take in more Norwegian immigrants. Nielsen replied that Trump was discussing immigration "from a merit-based perspective" and that he wanted immigrants "with skills who can assimilate and contribute to the United States, moving away from country quotas and to an individual merit system."

A little later, Leahy asked Nielsen, "Norway is a predominantly white country, isn't it?" After stuttering, she replied, "I actually do not know that sir, but I imagine that is the case."

Nielsen's interrogation, however, was far from over. Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) — who was in the room with Nielsen when Trump reportedly made the comments during a meeting on immigration — wasted little time in asking, "How did [Trump] characterize those countries in Africa?" Nielsen claimed to not remember exactly what the president said because of "cross conversations" and "rough talk by a lot of people in the room."

Durbin pressed on: "Do you remember the president saying expressly, 'I want more Europeans, why can't we have more immigrants from Norway?'" Nielsen said that she remembered Trump asking about "the concept of 'underrepresented countries'" but her memory failed her in regards to the president's alleged profanity. Durbin did get Nielsen to admit that Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) used "tough language" as he quoted the president, but Nielsen did not explicitly confirm the use of the word "shithole." She would only say, "I remember specific cuss words being used by a variety of members." Kelly O'Meara Morales

12:28 p.m. ET

Kim Kardashian and Kanye West welcomed their third child, a daughter, early Monday morning, Kardashian announced on her website Tuesday. The daughter, whose name has not yet been announced, was born via a surrogate due to a life-threatening health condition Kardashian experienced during her first two pregnancies, placenta accreta. A surgery to allow her to safely have a third child had been unsuccessful, the New York Daily News reports.

"Kanye and I are happy to announce the arrival of our healthy, beautiful baby girl," Kardashian wrote. "We are incredibly grateful to our surrogate who made our dreams come true with the greatest gift one could give and to our wonderful doctors and nurses for their special care. North and Saint are especially thrilled to welcome their baby sister." Jeva Lange

12:13 p.m. ET
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President Trump's former chief strategist and campaign CEO Stephen Bannon was reportedly subpoenaed last week by Special Counsel Robert Mueller to testify before a grand jury, a person familiar with the decision told The New York Times. This is the first known instance of a grand jury subpoena being used on someone in Trump's inner circle, and "could be a negotiating tactic," the Times writes, noting that Mueller "is likely to allow Mr. Bannon to forgo the grand jury appearance if he agrees to instead be questioned by investigators in the less formal setting of the special counsel's offices in Washington."

But as Solomon L. Wisenberg, who served as a prosecutor for the independent counsel that investigated former President Bill Clinton, observed: "By forcing someone to testify through a subpoena, you are providing the witness with cover because they can say, 'I had no choice — I had to go in and testify about everything I knew.'"

Bannon testified behind closed doors Tuesday in front of the House Intelligence Committee which, like Mueller, is looking for evidence of Russian interference in the election. Rep. Adam Schiff (Calif.), the top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, told ABC News that he has questions for Bannon about Trump-related money laundering, among other inquiries. Jeva Lange

10:35 a.m. ET
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Americans are predictably polarized on whether President Trump aced or failed his first year, a new Politico/Morning Consult poll published Tuesday reveals.

While 34 percent say he should get an A or B for the last 12 months, slightly more — 35 percent — give Trump an F. Middle ground is sparse, with 11 percent scoring Trump's year with a D and 14 percent a C average. At the individual issue level, Trump scored best on the economy, jobs, and fighting terrorism and worst on draining the swamp.

Broken down by demographic markers, the poll results stayed consistent with past survey trends. Men remain more positive about Trump than women, as do Republicans compared to both Democrats and independents. Trump's grades have gotten worse overall since his 100-day mark, when Politico/Morning Consult conducted the same grading poll, but Republicans are actually happier with him now than they were then. Bonnie Kristian

10:27 a.m. ET
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On Tuesday, Japan's state broadcasting organization, NHK, sent out a terrifying mobile notification which read: "NHK news alert. North Korea likely to have launched missile. The government J alert: evacuate inside the building or underground." Japanese residents only had a very brief time to contend with existential questions about how to spend their final moments; the apocalyptic warning was retracted minutes later, CNN reports.

Japan's false alarm occurred just three days after a similar alert was sent by mistake to residents in Hawaii on Saturday, sparking widespread panic before it was rescinded. NBC News notes that Tuesday's alert was only sent to people who had NHK's app installed on their phones, and while NHK published the alert on its website, it did not air on TV. "Due to the quick response from [NHK]," NBC News explains, "there was limited social media commentary regarding the incident in Japan." By comparison, Hawaii's weekend nuclear scare — complete with blaring sirens — went out to basically everyone with a cell phone, and continued for an exhausting 38 minutes before it was deemed a false alarm caused by human error.

Exactly how Japan's false alarm occurred isn't yet clear. Kelly O'Meara Morales

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