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January 12, 2018
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Ohio Gov. John Kasich (R) and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush (R) began their New York Times op-ed on President Trump and immigration by recapping the tale of Elián Gonzalez, the young Cuban boy who made it to Florida in 1999 and then, when U.S. courts ruled he had to return, was "pulled from the arms of a sheltering adult by a team of heavily armed federal agents," a scene "seared in the minds of many people as a low point in the immigration debate." Under Trump, "brace yourself for the possibility of seeing this kind of scene again," they wrote.

Bush and Kasich were focusing on Trump's decision to rescind residency and work protections for about 200,000 Salvadorans invited in by the U.S. after a 2001 earthquake in a "merciful act." They collectively had 190,000 kids in the U.S. and "it is wrong to potentially break up so many families that have for so long made the United States their home — legally and at our invitation," the governors write.

The Republican Party has "consistently and rightly advanced policies to support the essential role of families in America," and "singling out Salvadoran families for separation is simply a bad idea that should be dropped," Bush and Kasich write, quoting former President Ronald Reagan. Securing the U.S. border and figuring out how to normalize the status of "the 10 million to 15 million undocumented immigrants" already here — "who, let's be honest, will not and should not be forcibly removed" — are the two biggest challenges, they add, and "when prioritizing the immigration problems we face, the case of 200,000 Salvadorans who accepted our invitation to live and work here legally would not even make a Top 10 list."

Kasich and Bush wrote their op-ed before Trump reportedly called El Salvador, Haiti, and African nations "shithole countries," but Bush tweeted that he hoped the president's alleged words "were just a crass and flippant mistake, and do not reflect the hateful racism they imply." Peter Weber

2:52 p.m. ET

A leaked draft of the White House's infrastructure plan has surfaced over at Axios, and although specific funding numbers are not attached, the document offers the first details in what has so far been a fairly confusing process.

What we know: The $1 trillion infrastructure plan is one of President Trump's biggest campaign promises, and there is a lot at stake for his administration in how it gets executed. The leaked document breaks down spending into categories, where infrastructure incentives make up 50 percent of total appropriation and encourage "state, local, and private investment in core infrastructure by providing incentives in the form of grants." Transformative projects, which "must be exploratory and ground-breaking ideas," make up 10 percent, rural infrastructure makes up 25 percent, federal credit programs 7 percent, and the federal capital financing fund 5 percent.

A key detail of the plan is that it prioritizes "projects associated with new, non-federal revenue," transportation expert Yonah Freemark writes, with that accounting for 70 percent of the scoring criteria. "This makes sense as the whole framing of the Trump proposal has been that it is incentivizing '$1 trillion' in spending, "Freemark adds. "This is only possible if other, non-federal, sources of funding become available."

As both Freemark and others noted, grants would also decline from funding upwards of 50 percent of project costs to a ceiling of 20 percent:

Read the full document — which is a draft and subject to change — here, and read more of Freemark's analysis on Twitter. Jeva Lange

2:36 p.m. ET
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Vice President Mike Pence on Monday addressed reports that President Trump called African nations "shithole countries," more than a week after the comments were first reported by The Washington Post.

In an interview with The Associated Press, Pence defended the president from accusations of racism, telling AP that Trump does not support immigration policies that are based on race or nationality. "I know the president's heart," Pence said. Instead, what the president does support is a "merit-based" immigration policy "that puts the interests of America first," Pence said.

Pence similarly invoked the president's "heart" when defending Trump after he said in August that there were "very fine people on both sides" of a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia. AP noted that Pence "did not directly answer a question about whether Trump's language was appropriate" in the Monday interview.

AP also asked Pence about Trump's alleged affair with adult film star Stormy Daniels, which Daniels detailed in a tell-all interview with InTouch Weekly last week. The vice president called the story a "baseless [allegation] against the president." Kelly O'Meara Morales

2:19 p.m. ET

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court has ordered a redrawing of all 18 of the state's congressional districts for 2018 after finding gerrymandering that "plainly and palpably" benefited Republicans. "It's likely to cost the GOP a seat and undermine their position in others," wrote The New York Times' Nate Cohn.

The state legislature, which is Republican-controlled, has until Feb. 9 to approve a replacement map, which must also be approved by the Democratic-majority court and Democratic governor, The Associated Press writes. "Otherwise, the justices say they will adopt a plan in an effort to keep the May 15 primary election on track."

"Not only does a new, fair Pennsylvania map likely create 4-5 Dem leaning districts, it disrupts constituencies of Rep incumbents, erasing their incumbency advantage and making them more vulnerable in a Dem wave election," tweeted Michael McDonald, a University of Florida professor specializing in American elections. Although the Supreme Court could theoretically intervene, many experts don't see it as likely: "This is a state court decision that rests on state, not federal, law," added McDonald. Jeva Lange

2:03 p.m. ET
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Three members of the USA Gymnastics board resigned Monday in the wake of the scandal surrounding former team doctor Larry Nassar, who is accused of sexually abusing more than 130 of his patients over three decades. Board of directors chairman Paul Parilla, vice chairman Jay Binder, and treasurer Bitsy Kelley all resigned, a decision that president and CEO Kerry Perry said is a step that "will allow us to more effectively move forward in implementing change within our organization."

Nassar's misconduct has cast an unflattering light on gymnastics' governing body, with former Olympians speaking out against USA Gymnastics' handling of Nassar's abuse. "Nobody was protecting us from being taken advantage of," said Olympic gold medalist Jordyn Wieber during her victim impact statement at Nassar's sentencing Friday.

An investigator said last summer that USA Gymnastics needs a "complete culture change" to protect athletes. Jeva Lange

1:43 p.m. ET

White House Deputy Press Secretary Raj Shah said the Democrats "blinked" Monday by agreeing to join Republicans to reopen the government. Democrats supported a bipartisan bill to fund the government until Feb. 8 in exchange for a promise from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) that the Senate would address immigration issues, including the protections enshrined by the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals policy.

"I think that the fact that [Democrats are] voting in favor for this proposal that they rejected a few days ago is sort of evidence that they blinked," Shah told CNN's Wolf Blitzer.

The Democrats' decision passed the 60-vote threshold in the Senate and is expected to glide to approval in the House, but it is already controversial among many in the party. "Immigration advocates spent the morning rallying Democrats against the compromise deal with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY)," Talking Points Memo writes. Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) slammed her party's compromise, claiming that McConnell's comments "fell far short of the ironclad guarantee I needed to support a stopgap spending bill. I refuse to put the lives of nearly 700,000 young people in the hands of someone who has repeatedly gone back on his word."

Last week, MSNBC's Joe Scarborough, a former Republican member of the House of Representatives, told Democrats to not give the GOP "a single vote in keeping the government running … unless they give you a clean bill on DREAMers." Scarborough claimed: "If you do, you are too weak and too spineless and too stupid when it comes to politics and too cowardly to be given control of Congress in 2018." Jeva Lange

1:14 p.m. ET
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President Trump's need to disagree with his advisers may be borderline pathological.

Some aides have gone so far as to diagnose the president with "defiance disorder," The Washington Post reports, citing revelations from a forthcoming book written by the former Fox News host and Post reporter Howard Kurtz. Kurtz's book, Media Madness: Donald Trump, The Press, And The War Over The Truth, explains that some of the president's top staffers "privately coined" the term for Trump's "seeming compulsion to do whatever it is his advisers are most strongly urging against," the Post reports.

The New York Times' Maggie Haberman pointed out on Twitter that "defiance disorder" is in fact a valid malady, listed in formal psychiatry diagnostic texts, and not just a catchphrase for people in the White House to describe their boss' quirks. The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry says that ODD is marked by "defiance, spitefulness, negativity, hostility, and verbal aggression," while the Mayo Clinic recommends managing ODD by giving "unconditional love" and "recognizing and praising ... good behaviors."

Read more about Kurtz's book, which will be released Jan. 29, at The Washington Post. Kelly O'Meara Morales

1:11 p.m. ET
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Rumors have been swirling about President Trump and White House Chief of Staff John Kelly's tense relationship practically since the former Marine Corps general was promoted to the role last July, but Vanity Fair's Gabriel Sherman writes that things have now reached a point where Ivanka Trump is "trying to figure out who replaces Kelly," one person familiar with the situation said.

Causing particular fiction is the Mexico border wall, which Trump and Kelly have publicly disagreed over. Kelly told House Democrats last week that some of Trump's ideas were "uninformed" and have since "evolved," prompting Trump to respond that "the wall is the wall, it has never changed or evolved from the first day I conceived of it."

Privately, Trump hasn't appreciated the narrative of Kelly trying to smooth things over on his behalf. "I've got another nut job here who thinks he's running things," Trump allegedly complained to one friend, while another insider said Trump vented on the phone that Kelly "thinks he's running the show."

"The more Kelly plays up that he's being the adult in the room — that it's basically combat duty and he's serving the country — that kind of thing drives Trump nuts," one Republican insider said.

Even so, it might not take Trump pushing Kelly out for him to leave. The former general has "threatened to quit numerous times," Vanity Fair writes. Read the whole scoop here. Jeva Lange

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