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August 10, 2018
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An economic power play has sent Turkey's currency into a downward spiral.

The Turkish lira plunged more than 16 percent on Friday, while tensions simultaneously escalated between Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and President Trump, The Wall Street Journal reported.

Turkey's fragile economy already had investors worried about future financial health, with the lira down 23 percent against the U.S. dollar in the past week. Erdogan seemingly added fuel to the fire when he made a defiant speech on Friday, saying "Turkey won't surrender to economic hitmen" and blaming an "interest rate plot" that amounted to "a military coup attempt."

Trump did not take warmly to Erdogan's declaration of "economic war," announcing on Twitter that he would double tariffs on steel and aluminum. "Our relations with Turkey are not good at this time," Trump wrote.

The declining lira, which is at a record low, could frazzle markets all over Europe, CNN Money reports, especially now that experts expect that Turkey will need to take emergency action. "It's not clear that Turkey will be able to step back from the brink this time around," said William Jackson, an economist at Capital Economics. Summer Meza

1:59 a.m. ET
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Taliban militants stopped three buses driving through Kunduz province on Monday and abducted more than 100 passengers, including women and children, Afghan authorities said.

Mohammad Yusouf Ayubi, head of a provincial council in Kunduz, told The Associated Press he believes the fighters were trying to find government employees or members of the security forces on the buses. The area where they were abducted is controlled by the Taliban.

Abdul Rahman Aqtash, a police chief in Takhar province, said the passengers were from Takhar and Badakhshan, and headed to Kabul. On Sunday, Afghan President Ashraf Ghani said he would be open to a ceasefire with the Taliban through the Muslim holiday Eid al-Adha. Catherine Garcia

1:37 a.m. ET
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Hope Faith Wiggins set a goal for herself: to read 300 books before the summer was over.

The 8-year-old from Aldine, Texas, was successful, even surpassing that number; in mid-August, she had 302 books finished. She spent her entire summer with a book in her hand, and told ABC 13 she likes reading because "it's fun. It's like being inside of a whole other world. You can imagine that you're the character, and for me, one thing that happens when I read a book or watch a video is I dream about it."

Her mother told ABC 13 the "library opened up so many worlds. It was like a vacation, but inside our house." Wiggins read so many books that sometimes when her mother would suggest a title, she had to tell her she already read that book earlier. Wiggins, who said one of her favorite books is Our Enduring Spirit: President Barack Obama's First Words to America, received a medal from her library for completing the summer reading challenge. Catherine Garcia

1:33 a.m. ET

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) spent his August break traveling across the U.S. to shore up vulnerable House Republicans and, not coincidentally, bolster his bid to take over as leader of the House Republican caucus when Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) steps down, The Washington Post reports. McCarthy is close with President Trump, but he "faces persistent doubts among the most conservative GOP voters, who have long seen him as part of an establishment that has sought to sideline their views," the Post says. Those doubts helped sink his 2015 bid to become House speaker, and so he has been working "to strengthen his standing with conservatives by pushing for House action on spending cuts and hard-line immigration measures."

And recently, McCarthy, 53, has joined the ranks of Republicans accusing Twitter of censoring conservatives, a charge made on Twitter by Trump himself this weekend. But McCarthy's example of Twitter bias toward conservatives mostly demonstrated that he has chosen, wittingly or unwittingly, to screen out "sensitive content." As House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), a 78-year-old grandmother, pointed out:

McCarthy shot back on Twitter, "Once again Nancy has no idea what is going on," without explaining what Pelosi purportedly doesn't understand. In any case, if you, unlike McCarthy, would like to see "sensitive content" on Twitter without the scourge of "censorship," the Twitterati are happy to show you which box to check. Peter Weber

1:10 a.m. ET
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Lin Keitch thought her ring, a 40th birthday present from her husband, was gone forever, until dinner one night last week.

Her husband, Dave Keitch, dug out some vegetables from their garden in Somerset, England, and gave them to her to clean. "I cut the greens off and scrubbed them, and I thought, 'What's that? Goodness, it's my ring,'" she told BBC News.

Lin Keitch, 69, gave the ring to her daughter after it became too small for her, and she lost the ring in the garden at least 12 years ago. Lin Keitch and her husband were both surprised to see the carrot managed to grow through the ring, which even though it was covered in dirt, she instantly recognized. Dave Keitch said he would always look for the piece of jewelry when he was out there in the garden, and called it a "chance in a million" discovery. Catherine Garcia

12:27 a.m. ET
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In November 2017, a month after The New Yorker published its bombshell exposé of Harvey Weinstein's alleged sexual predation, actor and musician Jimmy Bennett contacted one of Weinstein's accusers, Italian actress and director Asia Argento, through a lawyer, asking for $3.5 million in damages related to a traumatizing sexual encounter in 2013, The New York Times reports, citing documents related to legal a settlement. Argento agreed to pay Bennett $380,000 over two years. Bennett was 17 and Argento was 37 when they had sex in her hotel room in California, the documents say. The age of consent in California is 18.

After accusing Weinstein of raping her, Argento became a prominent voice in the #MeToo movement.

Bennett, who started acting at age 6, was cast as Argento's son in a 2004 movie, The Heart Is Deceitful Above All Things, when he was 7, and they stayed in intermittent contact. "Jimmy's impression of this situation was that a mother-son relationship had blossomed from their experience on set together," his lawyer, Gordon Sattro, wrote in the notice of intent to sue. The documents, including a May 2013 selfie of the Argento and Bennett in bed, were sent to the Times by an unidentified party via encrypted emails.

The agreement did not include a nondisclosure clause, as California state law doesn't allow them and Argento declined to get around that by using a New York lawyer, "because you felt it was inconsistent with the public messages you've conveyed about the societal perils of nondisclosure agreements," her lawyer, Carrie Goldberg, wrote to Argento. "Bennett could theoretically tell people his claims against you," though "he is not permitted to bother you for more money, disparage you, or sue." Argento did not respond to numerous requests for a response, directly and through multiple representatives, the Times notes, and Bennett declined to be interviewed via his lawyer. Peter Weber

12:19 a.m. ET
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Opening in eight theaters on Friday, Kevin Spacey's new movie, Billionaire Boys Club, didn't even crack $300 at the box office in its first two days.

On Friday, the movie made $126, and on Saturday, just $162, The Hollywood Reporter said Sunday. That's less than most people spend at Costco on the weekend, likely due to Spacey having been accused last year of sexual harassment and assault by several men. After the allegations were made public, he was fired from House of Cards and his scenes in All the Money in the World were re-shot, with Christopher Plummer taking his place.

Billionaire Boys Club is a crime drama, also starring Ansel Elgort and Taron Egerton. Its distributor, Vertical Entertainment, announced it would become available on video on demand in July and then released in theaters, as to not punish everyone else who participated in making the movie. "In the end, we hope audiences make up their own minds as to the reprehensible allegations of one person's past, but not at the expense of the entire cast and crew present on this film," Vertical Entertainment said in a statement. Catherine Garcia

August 19, 2018
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Over the last several months, Michael Cohen's lawyer, Lanny Davis, has been having regular conversations with John Dean, Richard Nixon's White House counsel who took part in the Watergate coverup and then became a witness for the prosecution.

"I reached out to my old friend John Dean because of what he went through with Watergate, and I saw some parallels to what Michael Cohen is experiencing," Davis told Politico. "I wanted to gain from John's wisdom." He added that he's not asking him for legal advice and doesn't want to "raise expectations that Mr. Cohen has anything like the level of deep involvement and detailed knowledge that John Dean had in the Nixon White House as a witness to Nixon's crimes, but I did see some similarities and wanted to learn from what John went through."

Davis said he became friends with Dean in the late 1990s, when they appeared on cable news together to discuss President Bill Clinton's impeachment proceedings. Dean confirmed to Politico that the two have been having speaking to each other frequently, and said he'd also like to talk to Cohen's criminal defense lawyer, Guy Petrillo. Catherine Garcia

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