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October 11, 2018
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While Kanye West had a ball on Thursday with President Trump in the Oval Office, bringing up everything from abolishing the 13th Amendment to why the "Make America Great Again" slogan on a hat makes him feel "like Superman," his friends and family watched in shock, People reports, and they're now worried he won't listen to them and go back on his medication.

The rapper told Trump he's been "misdiagnosed" with bipolar disorder, after earlier announcing he's "off medication." A person close to West told People his family and close friends have been urging him to start taking his medication again, "that he's not doing well, that he's not making sense. Now he's in the Oval Office, and he's doing the same rant, and that's going to validate his rants."

During a recent Saturday Night Live appearance, West dressed like a Perrier bottle, then delivered a pro-Trump rant while the credits rolled, claiming he was bullied for wearing a MAGA hat. He also recently deleted his Twitter and Instagram accounts after making controversial statements about abolishing the 13th Amendment. His wife, Kim Kardashian West, fully supports him and believes in his right to express his opinion, but "having all this backlash against Kanye is embarrassing for her and her family," the friend said. Now that he's had an audience with Trump, "no one close to him can tell him that he's sounding unhinged, because his answer is that the president of the United States doesn't think so." Catherine Garcia

12:40 a.m. ET
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It all started with a blood drive at his church.

Richard Packman, 74, first donated blood in the early 1990s, and after being told by a phlebotomist he had "big veins," the Chicago resident made the switch to platelets. "It takes longer than a blood donation, but it's well worth it," he told The Chicago Tribune. "I really enjoy being a platelets donor because you really know you're saving lives." It takes about two hours to donate platelets, which are commonly used for cancer patients who lose platelets during chemotherapy treatment, but Packman said the time passes quickly, as he watches a movie or chats with staff.

Packman has spent an estimated 1,000 hours giving blood or platelets, and on Friday, made his 500th donation. A small celebration was held, with streamers and carrot cake, and Packman plans on continuing to donate beyond this milestone. "Just remember one thing: It's better to give than to receive," he said. Catherine Garcia

12:19 a.m. ET

Saudi Arabia has for years been known as "the super conservative country where women can't drive, gay people get flogged, and thieves have their hands chopped off," Trevor Noah said on Tuesday's Daily Show. It was taking strides to shed that reputation under Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, or MBS, until journalist Jamal Khashoggi vanished while visiting the Saudi consulate in Istanbul.

"So, a Washington Post journalist known for criticizing the Saudi government was seen entering the Saudi consulate, and then he was never, ever seen again," Noah recapped. "Now, I'm not a detective, but come on." The Saudi government has officially claimed Khashoggi left through the back door, but their security camera doesn't record images — an idea Noah found laughable. The Turkish government has another explanation. "Holy shit, 15 assassins, private planes, and a black van?" he asked. "This doesn't sound like real life, it sounds like the opening of a James Bond movie."

"So it's looking more and more like Saudi Arabia had Khashoggi killed, and this isn't just a big deal for Turkey and Saudi Arabia," Noah said. Khashoggi was a U.S. resident who wrote for The Washington Post, and the Saudis are U.S. allies, so this is an American problem, too. But President Trump, pressured to step in, has repeatedly accepted the Saudi leaders' denials, and he even introduced a random new suspect, "rogue killers," he noted. Since nobody's buying that, "Saudi Arabia is preparing to release their latest excuse," Khashoggi dying during an interrogation gone wrong.

"I don't know whether to be horrified or impressed," Noah said. "Because this is diabolical. The Saudi government is testing their excuse before officially using it." Michael Kosta explained why American should be "honored" that Saudi Arabia is testing its excuses because it shows "Saudi Arabia respects us enough to find a lie that works for both of us." Watch below. Peter Weber

October 16, 2018
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The lieutenant governor of Alaska, Byron Mallott, resigned suddenly on Tuesday, and Gov. Bill Walker (I) said he stepped down due to "inappropriate comments" made two days ago.

"As leaders, we must hold ourselves to the highest standards of conduct," Walker said. The governor said he found out about the comments on Monday, and that they were directed at a woman who has asked that her identity remain anonymous. Mallott and Walker were close, running on a "unity ticket" in 2014; Walker, once a Republican, was elected as an independent, and Mallott is a Democrat.

Alaska Health and Social Services Commissioner Valerie Davidson has been sworn in as lieutenant governor, and she said she was "deeply saddened" by Mallott's resignation and "profoundly disappointed by his conduct," adding, "respect for women and the dignity of all Alaskans is our responsibility." Davidson will replace Mallott as Walker's running mate in an increasingly difficult re-election. Catherine Garcia

October 16, 2018
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President Trump tweeted Tuesday night that the United States has sent a message to several Central American countries regarding immigration.

"We have today informed Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador that if they allow their citizens, or others, to journey through their borders and up to the United States, with the intention of entering our country illegally, all payments made to them will STOP (END)!" He didn't STOP (END) there, adding in a follow-up tweet, "Anybody entering the United States illegally will be arrested and detained, prior to being sent back to their country!"

There is a caravan of about 2,000 migrants headed to the United States from Honduras, and earlier in the day, Trump tweeted that if those people do not turn around and go back, "no more money or aid will be given to Honduras, effective immediately!" During the 2016 fiscal year, the U.S. gave Honduras $127.4 million in aid, the United States Agency for International Development says. Many people who migrate from Honduras are fleeing drug and gang violence and poverty, which would all likely grow exponentially if aid is cut off. Catherine Garcia

October 16, 2018
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Using facial recognition software, public records, social media accounts, various databases, leaked documents, and more, The New York Times was able to confirm that at least nine suspects in the disappearance of journalist Jamal Khashoggi work for Saudi Arabia's security services, government ministries, or military.

Khashoggi vanished on Oct. 2, after entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul. Turkey has said 15 Saudi agents flew into Istanbul that day on private jets, murdered Khashoggi inside the consulate within two hours of his arrival, then left the country.

The Times reports that one of the suspects is Maher Abdulaziz Mutreb, a diplomat assigned to Saudi Arabia's embassy in London in 2007. He's been seen getting off airplanes with Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman in Paris and Madrid and spotted in several photos taken of the crown prince during a recent visit to the United States. It's possible he was serving as a bodyguard. Other suspects include two members of the royal guard, a member of the security team who travels with the crown prince, and autopsy expert Dr. Salah al-Tubaigny, the Times reports.

Tubaigny, who holds a senior position in the Saudi Interior Ministry, could only be directed to do something by a high-ranking Saudi authority, the Times notes. This strikes a blow to the suggestion that rogue agents murdered Khashoggi unbeknownst to the crown prince. Both the crown prince and his father, King Salman, have denied knowing where Khashoggi is, and said he left the consulate on his own. None of the suspects could be reached for comment. Catherine Garcia

October 16, 2018
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If the Republicans lose the House in November's midterms, it's not President Trump's fault, Trump said Tuesday.

In an interview with The Associated Press, Trump said he will "handle it very well" if Democrats take over the House and launch new investigations or pursue impeachment. Trump has been hitting the campaign trail hard, he said, and doesn't believe "anybody has ever had this kind of impact." Democrats are polling well ahead of the midterms, and Trump said he did not agree that he's in a similar boat as former President Barack Obama, who in 2010 took some blame for his party getting "shellacked."

Trump also spoke about Michael Cohen, his former personal lawyer and fixer, accusing him of being a liar and "PR person who did small legal work," and defended calling adult film star Stormy Daniels "Horseface." AP asked him if he thought it was appropriate to comment on a woman's appearance, and Trump responded, "You can take it any way you want." He revealed that he should name U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley's replacement within the next two weeks, and blasted Attorney General Jeff Sessions, still unhappy that his recusal from the investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election led to the appointment of Special Counsel Robert Mueller. "I can fire him whenever I want to fire him," he said. Catherine Garcia

October 16, 2018
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President Trump defended Saudi Arabia on Tuesday, telling The Associated Press it wasn't fair to condemn the country over the disappearance of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

Khashoggi was last seen at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 2. Turkey has said he was killed by Saudi agents inside the consulate, and on Tuesday, a senior Turkish official told AP "certain evidence" was found that proved Khashoggi was murdered there.

Trump tweeted earlier in the day that he spoke with Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, who "totally denied any knowledge" of what happened to Khashoggi, and he told AP: "I think we have to find out what happened first. Here we go again with, you know, you're guilty until proven innocent. I don't like that. We just went through that with Justice Kavanaugh and he was innocent all the way as far as I'm concerned." Kavanaugh was accused of sexual assault by multiple women, and narrowly won confirmation to the Supreme Court. Catherine Garcia

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