×
March 19, 2019

A group of German archaeologists found about 400 artifacts from World War II after excavating three rural sites near the towns of Warstein, Suttrop, and Eversberg, LiveScience reported on Tuesday.

While exploring the sites of former Nazi camps, the researchers said that most of the 400 artifacts came from Langenbach Valley near Warstein, where LiveScience says 60 women, 10 men, and a child "were taken into the forest, under the pretense of being moved to a different labor camp, and then shot." The vast array of personal items included everything from prayer books and dictionaries to shoes, harmonicas, and Soviet coins — all believed to have been owned by and buried with the massacre's victims.

Bullet cartridges were also found scattered in the area, which could suggest that some of the Polish and Russian forced laborers tried to escape the firing squad. Nazis killed 208 laborers in the region at the end of the war, and only 14 of the victims have ever been identified by name, due to Nazi efforts to conceal their crimes.

Matthias Löb, the director of the Landschaftsverband Westfalen-Lippe — the group behind the excavation — said in a statement that despite the tragic finds, these discoveries serve as an essential reminder of the atrocities committed during that period. Löb also said Germany has seen an increase in "trivialization" and denial of Nazi crimes, and that the discovery of these artifacts are proof of a part of German history "that we have to face." Read more at LiveScience. Marina Pedrosa

5:16 p.m.

The House of Representatives has some absurdly specific rules.

Inside the manual governing the chamber's parliamentary procedures, there's a ban on calling the president "a little bugger," and on saying they "do not care about black people." And there's a broad rule against calling the president or anything they say "racist," which came into question Tuesday when House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) did just that.

After President Trump on Sunday tweeted racist attacks on four Democratic congressmembers, House Democrats on Tuesday introduced a resolution condemning them. Pelosi called the tweets "racist," and also "disgraceful and disgusting" on the House floor, and before she even finished her speech, Rep. Doug Collins (R-Ga.) asked if she'd like to "rephrase" that comment. Pelosi bluntly shut that idea down, and Collins moved to have Pelosi's words struck from the record.

Cue Democrats huddling, the arrival of House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.), and an hourlong delay that got a GOP meeting with Trump canceled. Finally, Rep. Emanuel Cleaver (D-Mo.), who was chairing the hearing, stepped back up. He then heatedly called the whole ordeal an "excuse to escalate," dropped his gavel, said "I abandon the chair," and walked away.

After several more minutes of nothingness, House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-Md.) affirmed Pelosi's words were "out of order," as the House parliamentarian had confirmed earlier. That meant Pelosi couldn't speak on the floor for the rest of the day, though the House still voted against striking her words from the record. And all the while, Pelosi stood firm with what she'd said. Kathryn Krawczyk

4:58 p.m.

Dr. Leana Wen, the first physician to lead Planned Parenthood in decades, was removed by the organization's board on Tuesday less than a year into her tenure, The New York Times reports.

People familiar with the situation said that Wen's removal was a result of internal strife regarding her management. That was magnified by the organization's general turbulence at the moment; several states are attempting to roll back abortion rights in an attempt to chip away at Roe v. Wade. Wen allegedly did not fit the bill when it came to political action, the Times reports, and the board was reportedly looking for a more "aggressive" leader.

In Wen's stead, the board voted unanimously to appoint Alexis McGill Johnson as acting president and chief executive of both Planned Parenthood Federation of America, which provides health care services, and Planned Parenthood Action Fund, the political wing of the organization. McGill Johnson has served on Planned Parenthood's board for nearly a decade and was previously its chair, the Times reports.

Wen, the former Baltimore health commissioner, apparently knew her tenure was over. But she doesn't seem thrilled with how it all went down.

In her statement, Wen wrote that she is leaving due to "philosophical differences" with the board, largely over their approach toward protecting abortion care. Wen said she views it "not as a political issue but a health care one." Read more at The New York Times. Tim O'Donnell

4:07 p.m.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) on Tuesday blasted President Trump for his "disgraceful" and "racist" tweets about four minority congresswomen.

Pelosi spoke on the House floor ahead of a planned vote on a resolution officially condemning Trump for the tweets telling minority congresswomen to "go back" to where they came from, which the resolution describes as racist. Pelosi on Tuesday said that Trump's comments were "disgraceful and disgusting," as well as "racist."

The House speaker also said it's "shameful" to hear Trump "continue to defend those racist words," which she described as "not only divisive but dangerous." Trump on Tuesday once again insisted that his comments were not racist, writing, "I don't have a racist bone in my body!" On Tuesday, House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) also came to Trump's defense over the comments.

"There's no excuse for any response to those words but a swift and strong unified condemnation," Pelosi said. "...To do anything less would be a shocking rejection of our values and a shameful abdication of our oath of office to protect the American people."

After Pelosi finished, Rep. Doug Collins (R-Ga.) requested for Pelosi's comments, which he called "unparliamentary," to be taken down due to a rule saying that "remarks may not refer to the president as a racist," reports Politico's Jake Sherman. A decision on that request has not yet been reached. Watch Pelosi's comments below. Brendan Morrow

3:49 p.m.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) had a tense exchange with President Trump's defense secretary nominee Mark Esper during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Armed Services Committee.

Warren didn't shy away from Esper's association with defense contractor Raytheon, where the Army secretary worked as a lobbyist. Warren seemed miffed when Esper would not commit to extending his recusal from issues involving Raytheon for his entire tenure at the Pentagon. He also refused to pledge not to seek employment in the defense industry for four years after leaving the government.

So, fast friends they did not make.

That said, Committee Chair Jim Inhofe (R-Okla.) drew extra attention to the tension, even apologizing to Esper "for what you had to be confronted with. It was unfair and you handled it beautifully." For what it's worth, Esper seemed less affronted than Inhofe.

No one else apologized to Esper, but other Republicans on the committee were critical of Warren, as well. Sen. Rick Scott (R-Fla.) said Warren just "needed a moment" for her 2020 presidential campaign, while Sen. Dan Sullivan (R-Alaska) said that she was "casually" using words like corruption "to get a little stink" on Esper, who said he has never been accused of corruption. Tim O'Donnell

3:23 p.m.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) has some steaming hot love for a microwaveable favorite.

In a Tuesday speech on the Senate floor, McConnell started to brief his colleagues on some international trade deal discussions slated for this week. He then zoomed in on one particular product from one particular country — Hot Pockets, a product of the Swiss company Nestle — and delivered a touching ode to the toasty treat.

"Practically every American is familiar with Hot Pockets," McConnell said, not adding how they're also familiar with how the pockets' cores remain impossibly cold while the breaded edge is scalding. "But not everyone knows that as of several years ago, every single hot pocket is cooked in Mount Sterling, Kentucky," creating about 1,000 jobs, McConnell added. That's why he's so adamant that senators vote to uphold a trade deal with Switzerland.

Now, without further ado, watch McConnell unfortunately not sing that iconic brand name on the Senate floor. Kathryn Krawczyk

2:51 p.m.

Marvel is officially doubling down on Thor in its new, post-Endgame era.

A fourth Thor movie is in the works with Thor: Ragnarok's Taika Waititi set to return as director, The Hollywood Reporter wrote on Tuesday. This will be the first time any hero in the Marvel Cinematic Universe receives more than three solo movies, as Comicbook.com points out. Captain America and Iron Man previously only had trilogies dedicated to them, although their storylines continued in the crossover Avengers movies and other installments like Spider-Man: Homecoming. Avengers: Endgame was the first time the MCU released a third sequel.

The third Thor film, Ragnarok, totally reinvented the character after two installments that even star Chris Hemsworth hadn't been entirely happy with, and it was the highest-earning entry by far, grossing $853 million worldwide compared to its predecessor's $644 million. Now, Marvel is breaking from its usual trilogy pattern in order to strike while the iron's hot and continue telling stories with the new version of the hero. While Endgame wrapped up the storylines of original Marvel heroes like Tony Stark and Steve Rogers, it left Thor's decidedly open, although it wasn't clear at the time whether his plot line would continue in the third Guardians of the Galaxy film, a fourth Thor film, or both. The answer, it seems, may be both.

Hemsworth had previously expressed his desire to keep making Thor movies, telling Variety in an interview earlier this year that "we've opened up such a different character" and that "I feel more energized for the possibility of where it could go." It's unclear when this fourth Thor film might be released, but an official announcement may come at Marvel's upcoming San Diego Comic-Con panel, which will take place on July 20. Brendan Morrow

2:30 p.m.

White House counselor Kellyanne Conway didn't do much to make President Trump's recent racist comments directed at four Democratic congresswomen look any better. She might have made things worse, though.

During a press conference on Tuesday, when reporter Andrew Feinberg asked Conway what countries Trump was referring to in his tweets (considering three of the four congresswomen Trump told to "go back" to the "places from which they came" were born in the United States), Conway responded by asking "what's your ethnicity?" Feinberg protested the relevancy of her question, while Conway explained that her ancestors were from Ireland and Italy.

She then went onto argue that the president told the congresswomen to return to the countries they came from "originally," which is true. But it also implies that Conway believes a person's country of origin is based on where their ancestors lived rather than where a person was born, which is not true. Watch the full exchange below. Tim O'Donnell

See More Speed Reads