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May 27, 2017
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President Trump may be asked to subject his tweets to legal scrutiny before posting them, The Wall Street Journal reported Friday night in a story covering changes to White House procedure Trump will entertain upon his return home from his tour abroad Saturday evening. The tweet vetting would be designed to avoid unforced errors as the Trump campaign and administration undergo scrutiny in federal investigations concerning Russian interference in the 2016 election:

One major change under consideration would see the president’s social media posts vetted by a team of lawyers, who would decide if any needed to be adjusted or curtailed. The idea, said one of Mr. Trump's advisers, is to create a system so that tweets "don't go from the president's mind out to the universe."

Some of Mr. Trump's tweets — from hinting that he may have taped conversations with Mr. Comey to suggesting without any evidence that former President Barack Obama wire-tapped Trump Tower — have opened him to criticism and at times confounded his communications team. Trump aides have long attempted to rein in his tweeting, and some saw any type of legal vetting as difficult to implement. [WSJ]

Many of Trump's critics and supporters alike have repeatedly (and unsuccessfully) urged the president to curtail his tweeting habits, as his posts often come back to bite him politically. Bonnie Kristian

May 19, 2017

Foreign leaders who meet with President Trump this week during his first tour abroad since taking office have been encouraged to tailor their conversation to his personal preferences and knowledge base, The New York Times reports. The big three bullet points to remember: Praise him for winning; don't talk history; and keep it brief.

After four months of interactions between Mr. Trump and his counterparts, foreign officials and their Washington consultants say certain rules have emerged: Keep it short — no 30-minute monologue for a 30-second attention span. Do not assume he knows the history of the country or its major points of contention. Compliment him on his Electoral College victory. Contrast him favorably with President Barack Obama. Do not get hung up on whatever was said during the campaign. Stay in regular touch. Do not go in with a shopping list but bring some sort of deal he can call a victory. [The New York Times]

Leaders and diplomats who do not speak English must cut their comments especially short, said Peter Westmacott, former British ambassador to the United States. Trump is "a guy with a limited attention span," Westmacott told the Times. "He absolutely won't want to listen to visitors droning on for a half-hour — or longer if they need an interpreter."

Trump is scheduled to make stops in Saudi Arabia, Israel, Italy, Belgium, and the Vatican. Pope Francis, with whom Trump will meet for the first time, learned English as an adult and is not confident in his mastery of the language, so he often uses a translator. Bonnie Kristian

April 30, 2017

President Trump celebrated his 100th day in office with a cheering rally crowd in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, Saturday evening, skipping the White House Correspondents' Dinner in favor of a return to the campaign trail.

"I could not possibly be more thrilled than to be more than 100 miles away from Washington's swamp, spending my evening with all of you and with a much, much larger crowd and much better people," he told supporters in a speech ranging from North Korea to ObamaCare to Hillary Clinton. "The media deserves a very big, fat, failing grade."

Trump reiterated his trademark promise to build an enormous wall along the southern border — "Don't even worry about it," he assured his audience — and mocked the "fake news" people "trapped" at the "very, very boring" dinner in Washington. Watch an excerpt of his comments below. Bonnie Kristian

December 31, 2016

President-elect of the United States of America Donald J. Trump sent out his well-wishes for the new year via Twitter Saturday morning, expressing his hope that even the haters will have a good 2017.

Trump's holiday magnanimity toward his enemies was previously in evidence on the 2013 anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, in which he tweeted his "best wishes to all, even the haters and losers, on this special date." Bonnie Kristian

December 10, 2016

President-elect Donald Trump sent out two tweets Saturday morning strongly criticizing any suggestion — specifically from CNN — that his ongoing role as executive producer of The New Celebrity Apprentice will in any way detract from his presidency.

As executive producer, Trump will be paid for each episode by MGM, the company of series creator Mark Burnett, and not by NBC, which airs the show. Top Trump aide Kellyanne Conway defended Trump's decision to remain a producer on Friday by comparing the role to President Obama's golf hobby. Bonnie Kristian

November 22, 2016
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Newt Gingrich said Tuesday that while he will support Donald Trump and his choice for secretary of state, he can think of "20 other people" who are more compatible with Trump's foreign policy vision than contender Mitt Romney.

While chatting with Tucker Carlson on Fox News, the former Republican speaker of the House said that since Romney, the 2012 Republican presidential nominee and an outspoken Trump critic during the primaries, once wanted to be commander in chief, there was a question of how much Romney would "represent himself" while traveling around the world. He then dragged Secretary of State John Kerry into it, saying Romney might follow his "tradition" of going from "five-star hotel to five-star hotel, having nice gourmet dinners with foreign ministers. To what extent would he actually represent the kind of tough-minded, America first policies that Trump has campaigned on?"

Throughout the campaign, Gingrich was a top surrogate for Trump, and he seems to be gunning for another Trump backer — former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani. On Monday, he said there are "huge advantages" to having Giuliani as secretary of state, and he has the "right temperament" to "represent American interest in the way that Trump campaigned." Catherine Garcia

November 13, 2016

President-elect Donald Trump handed over his Twitter access to his staff in the run-up to the election, and since then his account has been mostly silent. Sunday morning, however, Trump made his first Twitter attack since winning the presidency, criticizing The New York Times for its campaign coverage.

Trump was referencing a letter from the Times' publisher and executive editor which on Friday promised to "rededicate" the paper to honest, courageous journalism. The president-elect is not the Times' only critic of late; Bloomberg Politics editor Mark Halperin on Thursday said the newspaper's post-election headline, "Democrats, Students, and Foreign Allies Face the Reality of a Trump Presidency," was like something out of The Onion. Bonnie Kristian

November 5, 2016
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Because this is the classiest election ever — and really, why shouldn't a tabloid literally inspired by the way people morbidly gawk at car crashes be part of it? — The Wall Street Journal reports that The National Enquirer paid $150,000 to buy the rights to a tale of Donald Trump's marital infidelity and then suppressed it.

The newspaper allegedly made a deal with Karen McDougal, Playboy's 1998 Playmate of the Year, for her account of an affair she claims to have had with Trump in 2006 and 2007, well after he married his third wife, Melania. The Journal says it has obtained documents indicating the story was purchased and then never published, a tactic known as "catch and kill."

A statement from the Enquirer, which endorsed Trump for president, denied quashing the story and instead insisted McDougal was paid for "two years' worth of her fitness columns and magazine covers as well as exclusive life rights to any relationship she has had with a then-married man." The Trump campaign also vehemently denied the allegations, calling them "totally untrue" and claiming ignorance of the entire situation. Bonnie Kristian

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