Feeling the Bern
January 14, 2020

After a day of anonymously sourced reports about what Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) said to Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) in a December 2018 tête-à-tête, everyone is now on the record. "I thought a woman could win; he disagreed," Warren said in a statement released late on Monday. "I have no interest in discussing this private meeting any further because Bernie and I have far more in common than our differences in punditry."

Despite Warren's preferences, both she and Sanders will undoubtedly be asked to rehash what they discussed in that two-hour meeting at Tuesday's Democratic presidential debate in Des Moines, the last debate before the Iowa caucuses on Feb. 3.

Earlier Monday, Sanders called a CNN report that he'd told Warren a woman couldn't be elected in 2020 "ludicrous," recalling, "What I did say that night was that Donald Trump is a sexist, a racist and a liar who would weaponize whatever he could." Sanders campaign manager Faiz Shakir had predicted that if Warren did release a statement, she would say the report "is not true, that is a lie."

The open acrimony between the two progressive 2020 candidates started with a Politico report Sunday detailing how Sanders staffers are trying to flip Warren-leaning voters by suggesting she's the candidate of "highly educated, more affluent people" who will vote for the Democrats anyway. Warren said she was "disappointed" that Sanders is "sending his volunteers out to trash me," and Sanders said he did not approve the messaging and has never personally attacked his friend Warren.

Some progressives are getting worried about the escalation hurting both candidates. "This looks like a desperate attempt to fracture a coalition of the candidates that represent the most popular ideas among working people," said Sara Nelson, president of the Association of Flight Attendants union. Peter Weber

July 16, 2019

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) is making money moves, and they aren't even subject to his often touted wealth taxes.

In a Tuesday tweet, rapper Cardi B said she's been "reading about Bernie Sanders" and felt that "we let him down in 2016." After all, Sanders has "been fighting for equal rights, human rights for such a long time," Cardi continued. And well, she likes it like that.

A Twitter user responded to Cardi B's endorsement to point out she's complained about paying taxes in the past, seeing as Sanders' policies would likely lead to more of them. But Cardi noted she only has an issue with having no idea where her tax dollars end up.

The several conservatives who praised Cardi B's supposedly conservative tax stances may want to reconsider their support, especially after Sanders gratefully accepted Cardi's. Kathryn Krawczyk

February 10, 2016

HBO talk show host Bill Maher has endorsed Bernie Sanders for president. He likes Hillary Clinton, but "we've never had a leftist in my lifetime, a true leftist," he told Jimmy Kimmel on Tuesday's Kimmel Live. Sanders is "putting things on the table no one ever put on the table before." That doesn't mean Maher thinks Sanders will win, but he argued that the Vermont senator has earned the benefit of the doubt. "Now, is he probably going to win in the South? Probably not — he's a socialist Jew who's 100," he said. "But you know what? People have never seen this product before. People didn't know they wanted an iPhone until they put it in the window, and everybody bought it."

If Sanders doesn't win, "if we go back to the old rules, fine," Maher said. He's told his audience that he's for Bernie, "but Hillary's good, too. It's like if you're on a plane — if you don't get your first choice, eat the chicken." That may not seem like a rousing plug for No. 2, but when Kimmel asked, Maher made it clear he doesn't like any of the Republicans. You can watch him name and mock his least-favorite Republican candidate, and make his case for Sanders, below. Peter Weber

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