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April 26, 2018
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The parents of a college student held captive in North Korea have filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the country.

Otto Warmbier, 22, was held in North Korea for 17 months after allegedly stealing a political poster while touring the country. He was medically evacuated from North Korea last June and died a few days after returning home in a coma.

Now, his parents say he was "brutally tortured and murdered" and forced to "falsely 'confess' to an act of subversion on behalf of the United States government," per the lawsuit. They are suing to hold the government of North Korea "legally accountable" for their son's death, per The Washington Post, and are seeking damages.

North Korea alleges Warmbier died after contracting botulism and has denied nefarious involvement. But a U.S. coroner said an injury more than a year old, which starved Warmbier's brain of oxygen, caused his death. There were no clear signs of torture to Warmbier's body, the coroner said.

The suit comes amid a softening of tensions between North Korea and the U.S. Just-confirmed Secretary of State Mike Pompeo visited Kim Jong Un over Easter weekend, and President Trump is narrowing down a time to meet with the North Korean leader, per CNN.

Fred Warmbier, Otto's father and one of the plaintiffs, was Vice President Mike Pence's guest at the Winter Olympics in South Korea. Kathryn Krawczyk

April 26, 2018

The Senate confirmed Mike Pompeo as President Trump's next secretary of state Thursday. Pompeo, who was previously serving as CIA director, was sworn into office Thursday afternoon by Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito and immediately departed to Brussels for a summit with NATO allies.

In celebration of Pompeo's confirmation, White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders tweeted never-before-seen images of Pompeo meeting with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un over Easter weekend. Reports of Pompeo's secret meeting with Kim leaked earlier this month, and Trump later confirmed the summit occurred. See the photos below. Kimberly Alters

April 25, 2018
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Several South Carolina prison guards and workers have been indicted by a federal grand jury over smuggling contraband such as cell phones, tobacco, and drugs to inmates, The Post and Courier reports. The move follows a riot last week at the maximum-security prison Lee Correctional Institute that was "all about territory, all about contraband," in the words of South Carolina prisons chief Bryan Stirling. Seven people were killed in the fight, and 22 others injured.

"These people are fighting about real money and real territory when they are incarcerated," Stirling said, adding that the incident was sparked in part over cell phones, which can allow gangs to continue to conduct criminal activity while incarcerated, CBS News reports. Jeva Lange

April 25, 2018
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A 72-year-old man was arrested overnight on the suspicion that he is the long-sought "Golden State Killer" responsible for at least 10 homicides and 50 rapes in California between 1976 and 1986, The Daily Beast reports. The suspect, Joseph James DeAngelo, has not yet been "confirmed" as the Golden State Killer, although because of ample DNA evidence from crime scenes, a scientific confirmation could be relatively quick to follow. The Sacramento police are expected to hold a news conference at noon local time.

Billy Jensen, who helped research and complete a new book about the Golden State Killer by the late crime writer Michelle McNamara, said DeAngelo "looks good" as a suspect. Read more about the decades of work that have gone into solving the mystery here at The Week. Jeva Lange

April 25, 2018
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Danish submarine inventor Peter Madsen, 47, has been sentenced to life in prison for the torture and grisly murder of journalist Kim Wall, 30. Life imprisonment is the maximum sentence in Denmark, and it is rarely imposed, The New York Times reports.

Madsen was unanimously convicted of sexually assaulting and killing Wall last year, with prosecutor Jakob Buch-Jepsen telling the court that it is "a case so heinous and repulsive that as a prosecutor, it renders you speechless." Wall, a freelance journalist, had met with Madsen for a trip on his submarine for a story she was working on in August 2017. The prosecutor argued Madsen had plotted to assault and kill Wall on board.

The submarine, which was sunk by Madsen in an apparent attempt to hide the evidence, was ordered by the court to be seized and destroyed. Jeva Lange

April 23, 2018

Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin (W.Va.) will vote to confirm Mike Pompeo for secretary of state, he announced Monday morning. Manchin, a moderate senator from a red state, had been pegged as a likely cross-aisle vote for Pompeo.

President Trump tapped Pompeo last month to replace the ousted Rex Tillerson as secretary of state. The Senate Foreign Relations Committee is set to vote on Pompeo's nomination later Monday, where it is possible he will fail to receive a positive recommendation; Republican Sen. Rand Paul (Ky.) has already announced his opposition to Pompeo given Pompeo's hawkishness, and no committee Democrats support Pompeo.

Still, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) will likely proceed to a full Senate vote on Pompeo's nomination later this week. Democratic Sen. Heidi Heitkamp (N.D.) already announced her intention to support Pompeo, and her vote alongside Manchin's should be enough to overcome any Republican defections and propel Pompeo to the State Department. Kimberly Alters

April 20, 2018
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Swedish DJ Avicii, 28, was found dead in Oman on Friday, his publicist confirmed. "It is with profound sorrow that we announce the loss of Tim Bergling, also known as Avicii," the publicist, Diana Baron, said in a statement.

Avicii had retired from performing in 2016 after suffering "very public health problems for the past few years, including acute pancreatitis, in part due to excessive drinking," The Hollywood Reporter writes. In an interview, Avicii told The Hollywood Reporter that he "took on board too much negative energy" touring and that since quitting, "I'm happier than I have been in a very, very long time. Stress-free more than I have been in a very long time. I can't say I'm never going to have a show again. I just don't think I'm going to go back to the touring life."

Avicii's hits include "Levels," which went platinum in the U.S., and "Wake Me Up," which hit #4 on the Hot 100, Rolling Stone writes. "Devastating news about Avicii, a beautiful soul, passionate and extremely talented, with so much more to do," tweeted fellow DJ Calvin Harris. "My heart goes out to his family." Jeva Lange

April 20, 2018
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The Justice Department is stalling on recommended civil rights charges against the police officer who killed Eric Garner in 2014, The New York Times reported Friday. Federal prosecutors have recommended bringing charges against Staten Island police officer Daniel Pantaleo, whose use of a chokehold while subduing Garner on a sidewalk led to Garner's death and sparked the rallying cry, "I can't breathe."

The prosecutors assert that Pantaleo's actions constituted a clear excessive use of force. But the Justice Department is wary of acting on the recommendation because it fears a case against Pantaleo may be lost at trial, the Times explains, as "juries frequently give great deference to police officers for actions carried out under pressure." Pantaleo has said he was trying to execute a different maneuver to subdue Garner — one that would not have put pressure on Garner's neck, like the chokehold did — but that his posture was adjusted in the struggle as he "feared he would be pushed through a storefront window behind him," per the Times.

The department's decision under Attorney General Jeff Sessions is sure to spark backlash, given Sessions' spotty history with race relations as well as the overall posture of the Trump administration. But both Loretta Lynch and Eric Holder, who served as attorneys general under former President Barack Obama, had reservations about the case as well, the Times notes; while Holder was convinced the evidence supported an indictment for Pantaleo, he conceded that prosecutors might lose at trial, and Lynch vacillated for months as to whether charges were truly warranted at all.

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein has "convened several meetings" as to whether to approve the charges, the Times reports, which have "revealed divisions within the Justice Department." One source told the Times that Rosenstein would likely eventually decline to pursue the case. Read more at The New York Times. Kimberly Alters

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