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September 13, 2017
Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/AFP/Getty Images

The son of Michael Flynn, President Trump's former national security adviser, is a subject of the federal investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election and possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russian officials, four current and former government officials told NBC News.

Three of the officials said investigators are focusing on the work Michael G. Flynn, 34, did for his father's lobbying firm, Flynn Intel Group. A former business associate said Michael G. Flynn was his father's chief of staff and played a major role in running Flynn Intel Group. He is married with a son, lives in Northern Virginia, and received an associate's degree in golf course management and a bachelor's degree from the University of North Carolina-Charlotte, NBC News reports. He is also known to tweet inflammatory statements and spread conspiracy theories

Others reported to be under investigation are the elder Flynn and Trump's onetime campaign chairman Paul Manafort, and it's not clear when the focus on Michael G. Flynn began, NBC News said. Federal and congressional investigators are also looking at Michael Flynn's ties to foreign governments, including Russia and Turkey. In December 2015, Michael G. Flynn accompanied his father to Moscow, where the elder Flynn gave a paid speech at the 10th anniversary celebration of RT, the state-sponsored Russian television network. It was also revealed earlier Wednesday that the elder Flynn did not share on his 2016 security clearance renewal application that in 2015, he went to the Middle East to meet with leaders regarding a proposal to work with Russia to build nuclear reactors in Saudi Arabia. Read more about the two Michael Flynns at NBC News. Catherine Garcia

August 1, 2017

"President Trump's personal lawyer, Jay Sekulow, has some explaining to do," says Aaron Blake at The Washington Post. On Monday night, the Post reported that Trump had personally dictated the statement put out on behalf of his son Donald Trump Jr. about a meeting Trump Jr. agreed to in June 2016 with a Kremlin-linked lawyer, also attended by White House adviser Jared Kushner and then-Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort.

The president, flying back from Germany on Air Force One and overriding the tell-everything plan concocted by his advisers, reportedly worked with Trump Jr. to write a statement to The New York Times insisting that the meeting was "primarily" about adoption and "was not a campaign issue," when in fact it was arranged to discuss alleged Russian opposition research on Hillary Clinton. The problem for Sekulow, Blake notes, is that in several TV interviews he unequivocally denied that the president had anything to do with Trump Jr.'s statement.

On June 12, Sekulow told George Stephanopoulos that the Times' June 11 report was "incorrect," and "the president didn't sign off on anything. He was coming back from the G-20, the statement that was released on Saturday was released by Donald Trump Jr. and, I'm sure, in consultation with his lawyers. The president wasn't involved in that." He then told CNN's New Day that "I wasn't involved in the statement drafting at all, nor was the president." On June 16, he told Chuck Todd on NBC's Meet the Press: "I do want to be clear that the president was not involved in the drafting of the statement and did not issue the statement. It came from Donald Trump Jr."

Sekulow issued the Trump administration's response to the Post's inquiries, too, responding to a detailed list of questions about Trump's involvement in the statement-drafting with one sentence: "Apart from being of no consequence, the characterizations are misinformed, inaccurate, and not pertinent." Norm Ornstein, a scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, suggests Sekulow's past statements could "be grounds for serious sanctions by the bar," but they could also involve him deeper in the Russia investigation by Special Counsel Robert Mueller. Peter Weber

July 31, 2017
Alex Wong/Getty Images

While on a plane headed back to the U.S. from the G-20 summit in Germany on July 8, President Trump personally dictated the statement on his son Donald Trump Jr.'s June 2016 meeting with a Kremlin-connected Russian lawyer, saying they "primarily discussed a program about the adoption of Russian children," several people with knowledge of the incident told The Washington Post Monday.

This statement, sent to The New York Times before it ran an article about the meeting, was misleading, and it came out after more reporting that Trump Jr. agreed to the meeting after being told in an email that the lawyer had damaging information about Hillary Clinton, courtesy of the Russian government. The original plan was to release a statement that accurately spelled out what the meeting was about, so once the full details emerged, it would show they were being honest, the Post reports. Hours later, Trump became involved, and switched gears, dictating the statement himself.

Several of the president's advisers are now worried that by being directly involved, Trump could be accused of covering up the meeting's true agenda, the Post reports. Many also said they are afraid Trump is acting like his own lawyer, strategist, and publicist, and ignoring sound recommendations from his advisers. Read the entire report at The Washington Post. Catherine Garcia

May 15, 2017

Legal scholar Alan Dershowitz made a bold statement Monday night about the report that President Trump shared highly classified information with Russian officials during a meeting last week in the Oval Office.

"This is the most serious charge ever made against a sitting president," he told CNN's Erin Burnett. "Let's not minimize it. [James] Comey is now in the wastebasket of history. Everything else is off the table. This is the most serious charge ever made against a sitting president of the United States. Let's not underestimate it." Watch the clip below. Catherine Garcia